Where Have I Been? (I’ve been doing a lot of cool things, okay?)

Hi friends.

I'm Still Alive

Well, hope that gif sufficiently assures you that I haven’t dropped off the face of the earth.  Man, it’s good to be back.  I miss blogging when I (accidentally) take breaks from it.  I love this little community of writers and creatives, and I love getting to write out my thoughts on something, and have feedback and start a conversation.

So.  I’m back!

But Beth!  Where have you been?

Well.  I sorta took an (unintentional) hiatus from my writing.  *Gasp.*  A bunch of things happened which caused this:

  1. Spring semester of college started!  Woohoo!
  2. I have been quite busy and also slightly unmotivated.
  3. I have been working on other “creative things.”

Probably #3 is the biggest reason I’ve been MIA for a while.

So, hi, I’m Beth, and I have been doing other things besides writing.

For example, did you know that I have an Etsy shop?  Yep.  It’s quite small, and I’ve only sold a few things so far, but… still.  It’s pretty cool.  I make fan art and bookmarks and that sort of thing.  (Etsy.com/shop/fancifulbybeth if you wanna take a look lol.)

Or how about, did you know that I’ve been teaching myself guitar?  I’ve been playing for about 6 months, and I’m at the point now where I can have a mini jam session with friends, and actually play songs on guitar for people to sing along to.  Such a cool feeling.

Oh, and I may have started a YouTube channel?  Hehehehe.  I’m not super consistent in posting on it, but there are some bookish/ poetry/ writerly videos up there.  Here’s one that I’m super proud of, if your eyeballs are interested in watching.

 

While I really enjoyed an experimental challenge of trying to post a video each day in the month of February, I soon came to realize that I simply didn’t have enough time to do that once I started college again.  (A bit like attempting NaNoWriMo and realizing just how much time it takes to actually write 1700 words a day.)

Finally, I’ve also been writing more poetry.  I may share some more of it with y’all at some point, if that’s something you’re interested in.

What’s the point of this blog post?  Well, as I’ve stepped away from writing and into other creative things, I have come to two conclusions:

  1. I love learning new things.  But I sometimes fail to have the commitment or dedication to them to really make them work.  For example, it was so incredibly fun to teach myself to video edit.  To prove to myself that I could make YouTube videos, and make good ones.  To experiment with different effects, to learn faster methods, to make great video.  But.  I’m not feeling like I want to continue the YouTube channel as my main form of “Art-Making.”  Which leads me to my second conclusion.
  2.  When I’m not writing, I really, really miss it.  Not-Writing feels wrong.  I am a story-teller.  I am a writer.  I need to be writing.  My stories are bouncing around in my head, waiting to be written.  They are asking for attention.  They deserve to be told.  So, while I may experiment with other forms of art – be it drawing or poetry or making videos – I will always come back to writing.  It’s one of the hardest things to do, sometimes, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.  There’s nothing that quite matches the feeling of fingers on keyboard, breathing life into a story that didn’t exist before you wrote it.

I’m ready to get back to writing.  I’ve enjoyed toying around with other creative outlets, and I may continue to do so.  But I’m ready to be a writer again.

10 Oh I'm ready

3 Best Resources for New Writers

Welcome back, lovely writers!  Today, we’re going to cover the Three Best Resources for New Writers.  Like last week’s post, these resources are also recommended to the more experienced writer.  There are so many other resources and sites and blogs that are helpful (check out the Resources for Writers tab at the top of this site), but these two resources are the ones that made the most difference in my writing journey.  They’re also the ones that I most heartily recommend when I meet someone who is a new writer.

Enjoy.

1. Critique Circle (Website)

cc.png

 

This website, while it might not look the prettiest, is perhaps the most powerful tool to helping new writers hone their craft.  Warning: it will take time and energy to get fully reap the benefits of this site.  But if you put in the hours, you will learn so much.

Just a few of the cool features of this website:

  • Critiques.  You can give critiques on other people’s stories, and earn credits for doing so.  Then you can spend credits to post your own story (or a chapter of a novel), and other people will critique it.  Basically, they read through it and tell you how to make your story or your writing stronger.  Now, not every critique you receive will be The Greatest Advice Ever.  You will have some people just tell you where you left out a comma.  But there are writers on the site who know their craft, and they know it well.  And they are there to help you learn yours.  OH, AND YOU WILL ALSO LEARN SO MUCH from having to critique other people’s stories.
  • Forums.  There are forums for everything from Writing to Publishing to Poetry to Blogging.  And there are generally intelligent conversations, with a mix of Newbies and Oldies.  People are generally polite, helpful, and entertaining.
  • People.  I’ve made a handful of lovely writing buddies on this site.  There have even been a couple people who would critique my story, chapter after chapter, as I posted it.  It’s a site for making friends, finding blogs, finding a community.

While I may not be on there much anymore (I feel a bit as though I’ve outgrown it, but perhaps that’s arrogant of me), I still visit it every once in a while to check up on my old writing buddies.

One last note on Critique Circle: this was the website that got me from “I am writing a book?!  How?  What?  IS MY STORY EVEN GOOD?  What do I do from here?!” to “Okay, I know what changes I need to make to my writing.  I know how to write good dialogue.  I know how to write better characters.  I know what works and what doesn’t.  I know I am a writer.”  It’s the place where I grew the most as a writer, and I’ll always be thankful to the people who helped me to improve and inspired me to keep going.

2. Self Editing for Fiction Writers (Book)

self editing for fiction writers

Disclaimer: this is the only writing-craft book I’ve ever read.  And it was absolutely, entirely, wonderful.  It covers everything from plotting to dialogue tags to point of view.  It’s interspersed with practical examples, and shows you how to incorporate the ideas they teach.

The writing in this lil book is so good, too.  It’s snappy and quick and full of witty jokes.  There’s not a boring page in it, and the concepts are easy-to-grasp and so, very, incredibly helpful.  I cannot recommend it enough.

Hmm, I need to go find my copy and read it again.

 

3. @InspiredToWrite on Instagram

inspired to write.png I’ve followed Amie (instagram.com/inspiredtowrite/) on Instagram for over a year, and her words have filled me with such hope and joy.  She talks about her writing in a way that is real, and raw, and honest.  She won’t talk to you about adjectives and adverbs – she’ll tell you about how to find the strength to write after a long day, or about the absolute magic that storytelling is.

I highly recommend you follow her if you have an instagram.  She writes little letters in the descriptions of her posts.  Go read them.  They will bring you strength and hope as a writer, which is something that is in high demand.

And she’ll post updates on her stories about the mundane, day-to-day struggles of being a writer, such as what happens when your laptop dies at the coffee shop or I just got another rejection, how do I deal with this?

Go give her a follow.  You won’t be sorry.

// I’d love to hear in comments what you’ve found to be the writerly resource!  I’m always looking for more writerly communities, books on craft, and just excellent lil things to make our writing job easier. //

 

 

 

 

Advice for the New Writer

Hello, lovely writers!  I know many of you are time-honored pros – those who have spent years honing their craft and working towards their goals.  But some of you may not be!  So, I’d love to do two quick blog posts that touch on Advice for New Writers.  This one will be General Advice, and the next one will be The Best Resources for New Writers.

LET ME REASSURE YOU, that “old” writers, or “experienced” writers may also find these posts helpful!  We always need to be reminded the basics of writing.

well 10

Without further ado, here’s my 7 Pieces of Advice for New Writers (And Old Ones)

1. Write

Right, this may seem obvious.  But the most important thing for you to do as a new writer is to write.  Build the habit of writing (nearly) every day.  Teach yourself to squeeze writing in even on busy days.  Write lots.  And then write more.  And, keep writing as you do the other steps.  I won’t tell you that you have to write every day to be a “real writer” or anything like that.  But don’t get so caught up in becoming a writer that you forget to actually be writing.

2. Research

Do your research.  Read books on writing.  Follow writing blogs (like this one).  Listen to podcasts, watch YouTube videos, check out authors’ advice to writers.  Learn the “rules” of writing, and learn how to break them well.  There are so many resources available for free, right at your fingertips: either online, or at your local library.  Use them.

(And, if you’re not sure where to start, check out the Resources for Writers link at the top of this blog.  It’s full of great things you’ll probably love.)

Also, the next blog post I’m doing will be Best Resources for New Writers, so tune in then!

3. Read

Of course, a good sum of your time should be spent reading.  Read widely and vigorously.  Be observant as you read: what makes this story good?  What makes you love this character?  How does this author use semi-colons?  What makes for a good plot twist?  Critique the stories you read.  Learn to tear them apart.  It will make you a better writer.  When you can’t write, read.  Read and read and read.

4. Give and Take Critiques

This is extremely important.  Get your work critiqued, and give critiques to other authors.  I highly recommend the website CritiqueCircle.com as a great way to have your writing critiqued.  And the best part is that you have to critique other people’s writing as well, which is endlessly important.

You will grow so much as a writer as you have different writers giving you feedback on your work, and you will grow even more as you give feedback to other writers.

In addition, you’ll learn early on how to deal with constructive criticism, which is a skill every writer needs.

In addition to Critique Circle (or if it’s not a good option for you), I suggest checking out other writing groups.  There are a few others online (though CC is the best by far, IMO), and there are also many that meet in real life.  I was part of a teen writers’ group at my library for about a year when I was in high school, and it was always a lot of fun.  Or, if you’re an adult, you could try taking a creative writing class at your community college.  (I’ve taken one creative writing class at college so far, and it was a great experience.)

If you can’t find a writing group, ask a friend.  Ask your teacher.  Ask your family members.  Get feedback on your writing.  Learn to re-write and edit.  Get people who can critique your things, and ask them to destroy your writing.  Ask your readers and critiquers to not be gentle with you.  And then learn to take their thoughts and opinions well, without being hurt, and learn to sort through the suggestions you’re given and take what works best to make your story better.

5. Make Writer Friends

This is really important.  And with the internet, it’s increasingly easy.  Find blogs of writers, and follow them.  Comment on them.  Build a relationship.  Start your own writing blog if you want!  And when applicable, find people that will eventually be willing to Beta Read your story.  They’re invaluable.  Make friends on websites like Critique Circle, and watch each other’s novels grow.

While you’re at it, drop on over to the Guest Book here on this blog, and introduce yourself.  It’s a great way to meet people.  Alternatively, search up things like #amWriting or #YouKnowYou’reAWriterWhen on twitter, and you’ll find that there’s a beautiful Writerly Community on twitter as well.

6. Take a Deep Breath

I see a lot of advice for new writers that says something along the lines of “don’t rush!  It takes years before you can even dream of being published, so don’t even think about that until you’ve spent half a lifetime writing!”  And while I think that there is some truth to that, I also think that a lot of new (and especially young) writers will read this and either get discouraged, or just not listen because they feel like they’re not understood.

I know that when I was a new writer, I hated hearing this sort of advice that was tailored towards “teen writers” or “young writers.”  It frustrated me that “old writers” thought that I wasn’t a True Writer simply because I had only been writing for six months.

So.  I’m going to give you different advice.

Yes, it does take years, usually, from the time a writer types the first words of their novel to the time it comes out in print.  The process of writing, learning your craft, re-writing, editing, querying, editing again, more querying, working with your agent, and finally getting your book published simply takes time.

But don’t let that slow you down.  Don’t let that discourage you.  If you want to write, then write.  And if you want to edit your novel once it’s done, edit it!  And if you want to pour hours and hours and hours into learning the craft, writing new novels, editing them, getting them critiqued, querying them, finding an agent, and getting published, then do it.  No one is going to stop you.

The sooner you get started on this, the better.  If you start writing when you’re thirteen, then it just means you have a head start on the rest of us!  Celebrate that!  And enjoy the process.  Learning to be a good writer is great fun.  It’s exciting.  It’s hard work, many days, but it’s also so rewarding.  It’s an adventure to see your writing develop over time, and it’s so neat to see yourself grow as a writer.  Don’t let the long road to publication scare you into not pursuing your writing if you really want to be a writer.

And, at the same time, enjoy writing for writing’s sake.  If you only write because you want to get published, then writing may not be the job for you.  Write because you love it.  Because you have stories to tell.  And if you really want to get published, work for that.  But never write simply with the goal of making money or becoming famous.

7. KEEP WRITING

This is pretty self-explanatory.  All you need to do to call yourself a writer is to write.  But sometimes, as you get caught up in the blogging and editing and making friends and learning, you forget to actually write.  So hold on to your love of writing.  Hold on to the excitement of it, the thrill.  If you’ve found that you love to create stories, then that is a gift.  Use it.  I’ll be over here, cheering you on.

// What’s your advice for new/ young writers?  What do you wish you’d known when you started out writing?  Or, if you’re a new writer and you have questions, feel free to ask them in the comments!  And to all of you: happy writing! //

3 Things You Need for a Good Story

My dear friends,

I present to you today the most valuable piece of writing advice that you will ever receive.  (Probably.)

I would like to share a concept that I have used for years, whenever I critique stories (either my own, or others’).  This is the idea of the Golden Three, or, the three things you need for a good story.

And, they are, of course, Goal, Motivation, and Conflict.

If your character has these, your story will shine.

Oh look at that.gif

Here’s the thing: a good story isn’t just one event happening after the other.  A good story is about something, or someone.  And I have found that a great way to break your story down into its simplest parts is to look at the structure of Goal, Motivation, and Conflict.

Your main character(s) should always have these three things:

1. The Goal:

What does your character want?  What are they working towards in the story?  This can evolve as the story progresses, but your MC should always be striving for something.

2. The Motivation:

Why does your character want that?  What is driving them?  What is motivating them?  What makes them want this?  Again, this can change throughout the story, but there should always be a motivation behind your character’s actions.

3. The Conflict:

What stands in the way of your character’s goals?  What is hindering them?  This might be a person, a circumstance, a government, or an internal barrier.  While this will also change as the story develops, it’s often helpful to have one overarching Conflict, as well as smaller Conflicts along the way.

Have your characters want things.  Give them dreams and reasons they dream those things.  Give them things that stand in their way.  And if you find yourself at a point in your story where your character doesn’t want something, then mix things up.  And if you find that there’s nothing too tricky standing in their way, have everything go horribly wrong for them so that the conflict in their path is enormous.

At least, that’s what works for me.  Those are the stories I enjoy reading, writing, and watching.

Also, a note, others have talked about this before – this wasn’t my original idea.  It’s just one that I discovered a long time ago and have loved since.  There’s even a book called GMC that is supposed to be excellent.  But I don’t think that this topic is discussed enough, so I thought I’d share it around.

Okay, hope you are all having a lovely day, and that your writing is going swimmingly.

 

The Setting of a Writer

// Setting: noun. the place or type of surroundings where something is positioned or where an event takes place. //

As writers, we sometimes discuss the setting in our writing: the forest where the lost traveler finds himself at night, the tavern where the princess in disguise strikes a deal for her father, the garden where the love interest finally confesses his burning passion.  But what about the setting of our writing: where it happens, what it looks like, how it feels, what we wear?

Today, I wrote for a short while at my local Panera Bread (excellent choice for writing, if you ask me).  Tonight as I scrolled my twitter feed (follow me, @3lizabeth_A) something caught my eye: an author I follow (Ally Carter) posted that SHE had been writing at HER Panera Bread today as well.  And.  Wow.  For a shining moment, I saw myself as an author.  Not just a writer, like, someone-who-writes-for-fun, but an Author, someone who publishes books.  I had been working on a novel at a Panera Bread, while, at the same time, one of my favorite authors had been working on her novel at another Panera Bread somewhere else in the world.  It was a magical feeling.

So.  On the topic of writing and setting and all that jazz.

I wrote my first novel, The Sound of Color, almost entirely in my bedroom.  Sixteen-year-old Beth was a little terrified of the fact that she was writing a novel, so she kept it a secret for a while – a private, behind-closed-doors thing, only shared with a select few.  I wrote it in an armchair from my grandparents, with slippers on my feet and silence in the room.  It was a late night love affair, requiring only a Lord of the Rings soundtrack and a wild imagination.

But THEN, the 2015 NaNoWriMo struck and everything changed.  A busy Senior in Highschool, if I was going to write 50,000 words in a month, I was going to have to get creative with where I wrote.  So I brought my laptop to school and wrote between classes.  I’d write during carrides and lunch breaks, letting my novel-writing bleed into all the other areas of my life.  It was so freeing to write anywhere and everywhere.

And then I moved off to college.  And to be honest, I’ve struggled to find a time and place that feels right for writing when I’m away from home.  But I am teaching myself to let writing bleed into my “adult life” as well.  I’m teaching myself to look for Writing Spots.

So now?  Now, writing happens at Panera Bread in the half hour before meeting a friend for lunch.  It happens late at night with candles lit because the power has gone out, and I’m hoping my laptop battery lasts until I finish the chapter.  It happens in a childhood bedroom while I wait for my best friend to get out of the shower after I’ve dyed her hair.  It happens at the table after dinner, dishwasher humming in the background, family members talking in the other room.  It happens in a quirky coffee shop on campus, or in a busy college library.

One of the things that I’ve learned about myself in the past year is that I tend to write better when I treat is as something professional, or official.

Power to you, writers, if you can write in sweats and sweaters, laying in bed, with the covers pulled up to your chin.  The writing you do is still valid and still hard work and still important.  But I’ve found that I write the best if I take five minutes to put on real shoes, do my hair, and pretend like I’m going to a meeting.  If I try to write when I’m in bed or in my room, it’s too easy to sneak over to YouTube or Facebook or Twitter.  But if I dress like I’m off to a meeting, and I take my laptop to a table or desk, then it feels like I’m there to get something done.  And so the writing gets done much easier.

So, I’m curious: what do you all wear to write?  Where do you write the best?  I’m fascinated by how different settings can effect my writing so much, and I’m curious if you all experience the same thing.  Let’s chat in the comments.

// ps, this post is partially inspired by my friend Vivian’s recent post about writing and sweaters and books.  she’s great, go check her out. //

Just a Little

In the past four or five days, this is all the writing I’ve done:

Tuesday: 75 words

Wednesday: 73 words

Today: 315 words

These numbers might not look that impressive.  But each of those numbers represents a small victory for me.  None of those were days I wanted to write.  I felt uninspired, unsure, and a little annoyed.  Will this book ever end?  Will it ever be publishable?  Why am I even doing this?  Where is this plot going?

After writing another 75 words today, I was ready to close my laptop and call it quits for the day.  But I didn’t.  I decided to write one more sentence.  And then that spawned the idea for another sentence.  Three paragraphs later, I feel like I’ve finally written myself around the little wall of writer’s block that’s been in my way all week.  I got through the hard scene, and now I’m onto the exciting one.  Now I have a new idea to work with when I write tomorrow.

The longer I’m a writer, the more I’m learning that I need to push myself to work on my novel every day that I can.  And the more I do that, the easier it is to write.

So don’t stress if you can’t write 1,000 words every day.  Make yourself goals and try to stick to them.  For the next week, my goal is to write something on my novel every day.  It doesn’t have to be a ton, but I’m going to try to write consistently every day, even if it’s just a little.

Why I Blog

I’ve been a blogger for over two years now.  I have nearly 100 followers (love you guys!) and I’ve written 119 posts.  So I thought that now would be a good time to share the why behind this blog.

Here’s four things I love about this blog:

1. Getting to talk about writing

I don’t actually talk about writing with my friends that much.  It feels a bit personal, complicated, messy.  It’s just… not something I talk about with people that much.  And I don’t currently have any writer friends in “real life.”  So it’s fun to get to share things that I learn about writing with people who want to hear them.  It’s fun to get to shout to the world that I discovered how the heck to write setting, or what close POV really means. (Non-writers just don’t get it, do they?)

2. Instantly Rewarding

When I write a novel, I spend months or years writing and editing before anyone else reads it.  It’s a really long process, and while the writing itself is enough of a reward, it takes forever and a day before my writing is ready to be shared.

But with blogging, it’s so fun to see people enjoying my thoughts and words soon after they’re written.  I love posting something right before going to bed, and then waking up in the morning to an inbox full of emails saying “so-and-so liked your post.”  It’s wonderful to know that people are enjoying things I have to say.  It makes me feel like my voice matters.

3. Inspires me to keep writing

I’m not quite sure how this works, but keeping a writing blog motivates me to keep writing novels.  When I write blog posts, it’s a reminder to myself that I am a writer.  I have stories to tell.  I have a voice.  I have stories burning inside me.  Sometimes I’ll even write lil pep talks to myself in my blog posts, and that’s such a powerful thing to do.

4. Community

I can’t tell you how cool it is to find like-minded people who understand.  You folks know the joys and struggles of writing.  You know the pain of writer’s block and the joy of finishing a draft.  I love being connected to people who understand.  And when you beautiful folks comment on my blog posts and share your thoughts?  You give me hope and happiness.

So.  Thank you, readers.  Thank you, followers.  Thank you to the people who like and comment and share.  You help keep me motivated and positive.  You help me be a better writer.

That’s why I blog.  For you.

On Fear, and Writing for Fun

Bit of a mini-post today.  I just got back from Scotland last week, and I’m leaving the country again tomorrow!  So I’m a bit short on time.  But here’s something that’s been on my mind for a while.

Sometimes, I approach writing with fear or trepidation or pressure or worry or just general negativity.  I found this video (see below) a while ago, and I felt it related really well to being a novelist.  So often, I sit down to write with a voice in my brain going you have to publish story this someday.  You MUST be ‘good enough’ and you MUST write well.  Come on, you’ve been a writer for three years now.  Do better.  Get your act together.  If you’re not good enough, it’s just a whole waste of time.

I found an answer to this problem in a video by Tessa Violet.  She’s a phenomenal YouTuber and singer as well.  In this video, she talks about songwriting, which is super cool – and I think it compares well to novel-writing.  She says this wonderful phrase about two minutes into the video:

“A great way to never write anything is to enter into creativity with fear.”

 

You don’t have to watch the video if you don’t want to.  But she makes an excellent point: fear is the opposite of creativity.

So how do we stop this?  For me, it’s reminding myself that writing is play.  It’s fun.  I have to remind myself that (for now), it’s my HOBBY.  It means taking the pressure off myself to be perfect.  It means reminding myself of the things I like about writing.

It means letting myself enjoy the process, instead of being so very focused on the end result.  It means writing for me, and only me.  For MY enjoyment.  If I share my work later, that’s great!  If I get published later, woohoo!  But my rough draft is only for my eyes, and for my enjoyment.  (Not that every day of writing will be fun, or that it’s all sunshine and butterflies.  But since I’m currently not getting paid to write, literally the only reason I write is because I enjoy it.)

So.  If you’re finding it hard to write right now, maybe take the pressure off for a bit.  Write for the sheer fun of it.  Let your creativity flow, and give yourself permission to have a good time.  You never know what might happen, and you might be surprised by how good your writing is.

P.S. If you’re interested in more YouTube videos about writing and art, I recommend these: John Green, Cheyenne, Wyoming.  Nathan Zed, You’re Not Good Enough.

A Little Thing I Wrote

Some days, the words just won’t be written.  The novel is hiding in a far-off land, the plot is taking the day off.  On those days, you take the elevator to the top floor of your school’s library, let go of your expectations, and simply write for fun.  Sometimes, writer’s blocks need to be written around.  Sometimes you need to remind yourself how to connect your brain to your fingers to the keyboard.  Sometimes you need to remind your fingertips how to sing their melody as they tap the rhythm of a story.

Somedays, you don’t get any noveling done, but you fall a little more in love with the power of writing.  Somedays, that’s all you need.

I’d love to now share with you a little thing I wrote: Libraries and Dragons.  It’s not really a short story – more like an essay in an imaginary world.  It hasn’t really been edited; it’s not going to win any awards.  But I love it anyways, and this little tiny piece reminded me that writing is a sort of magic that I adore.  So.  Enjoy.

One last note: the first paragraph is a note to myself.  But it’s kinda a part of the piece, so I left it there.

Alright, brain.  You’ve had your coffee, now write your words.  Forget the product, the answer, the perfection.  Write the words.  The words are the only thing you care about.  The words, the words, the words.

All libraries are living things.  Picture them dragons, if you will.  They’re not dragons – no, they’re nowhere near as polite as dragons – but picture them dragons for a minute.  They’re really quite similar if you think about it.

The largest of the dragons are the Nightmares, ancient things, all black scales and blazing eyes, huge leathery wings that haven’t tasted night air in centuries but would blanket the world in darkness if they were opened.  These dragons are like the Great Old Libraries.  The libraries that now only exist in faraway lands and are in danger of disappearing entirely.  Most people only see pictures of them on Pinterest.  But a picture can’t capture the smell of thousands of souls, aging away together for centuries until their stories are all intertwined.

The next in size are your Sea Dragons – not really dragons, per say.  (Although never try telling a Sea Serpent that she’s not a real dragon; it will be the last thing you say.)  These represent your – uh – electronic libraries.  Provided for you by deities such as the great River-God Amazon.  Do they count as real libraries?  Can a book still be a book if it’s pixels instead of paper?  Can a dragon still be a dragon if she doesn’t breathe fire?

The next largest in size are the Green Giants.  It’s said that they like to impersonate hills, curling up for years on end, covering themselves in dirt blankets, letting green grass feel at home on top of their already emerald scales.  These are the noble dragons, quick to come to the aid of needy kingdoms, quicker still to deliver justice to those who betray their trust.  These are like College Libraries.  They come in many shapes and sizes, but most are light-filled and shiny, always being renovated and repaired, full of bustling students and sleepy sunshine.  If you’re not careful with them, they’ll suck you away and you’ll never be seen again.

Then you’ve your Common Dragons – your Public Libraries.  They come in all shapes, sizes, textures, and colors, each full of their own magic.  First there’s the fast-growing White Dragon, which is full size in six months, and eats only vegetation.  These are the shiny new public libraries, such as you’ll find in any suburbia: spacious and brimming, with smiling librarians and fast wi-fi.  Second, you have the Blue Gypsies – these smaller dragons are known for speaking in verse and giving directions (usually in rhyming couplets) to those who have lost their way.  These are represented by those quaint, compact little libraries you’ll find in small towns. Candles of light and knowledge for the weary traveler come home.

Finally, we come to the Hound Dragons, named for their small size and dog-like trainability.  These are the most popular species to keep as pets, as they are quite happy to nest indoors, and also will follow humans with unwavering devotion if they are treated fairly.  The males are deep purple and the females are scarlet, and they have clever faces, bright eyes, and nimble talons.  Their smaller wings are only practical for short-distance flying, and they prefer climbing, hoping, and bounding with short bursts of flight, unmistakably like large grasshoppers.  These dragons are like Home Libraries.  Some are quite small, some are more impressive; some are old, and some are filled with crisp new spines.  Like the Hound Dragons, home libraries tend to reflect the nature of their owners, and one can learn a great deal about what sort of house one is in simply by examining either the dragon or the library.  If a house is missing one or both, it is recommended that you exit the premises as soon as possible, as the home may be prone to Nargle infestation.

There you have it: hopefully this discussion will help you in the future, either when dealing with the winged beasts or the book-filled creatures.

Write Whatever

I’ve had a lot of trouble writing my current WIP.  I feel like I’ve been working on it forever, but I don’t know where the plot is going.  I don’t know how to write a contemporary, I don’t know what the stakes are, and I just feel burned-out when I try to work on it.  I’ve just felt blehhhh every time I sat down to write.  I’d open the world document and just stare at the screen, unable to lift a finger.

So.  That’s fine.  Sometimes, stories do that to us.  Sometimes, they are just persnickety and don’t want to be written.

The important, thing however, is to not stop writing.  If one story isn’t working, and you’ve taken some time off to read and think, and you come back to it, and it’s still not working, (and you’ve repeated this ad nauseum) then it’s time to write something else.

Write something different for a while.  Have another novel you’re writing?  Work on that.  Have something you should be editing?  Work on that.  Want to play around with poetry?  Do it!  Have a song you want to write?  Write it!  It doesn’t matter.  Write short stories, write blog posts, write poetry – heck, if you want to, even write fanfiction.  Do whatever it takes to get your creative-gears moving again.

Sometimes when I hit a wall in a project, my instinct is to just sit and stare at the wall.  And complain about the wall.  And study the wall.  And write blog posts about the wall.  But maybe what I need to be doing instead is writing a different project for a while.

Does that mean I’m totally abandoning this project that I’ve spent so much time working on?  Probably not.  But I’m just not going anywhere with it right now.  So let’s go somewhere else instead.

Which leads me to my other point for today: write what excites you.  I write to escape, to go to a world that I love, to meet people that only exist in my head.  I write for fun, for adventure.  And the novel I was trying to write doesn’t have any adventures.

So, I’m writing other stuff.  I’ve written some really fun fanfiction.  I’ve written some short blurbs and beginnings of stories.  And now I’m working on re-writing/ finishing/ installing a plot into an old novel that I adore and want to breathe life into.  And for the first time in many weeks, I’m excited about writing.  I’m excited to be returning to this other story, to this other world.  It’s a bit daunting, but it’s also the most fun I’ve had with a WIP in a long time.

Let your imagination run wild.  Write whatever the heck you want to.  Adventure awaits.

adventure is out there!